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Safeguarding Policy

Safeguarding Policy

Safeguarding Policy

Email

• All staff will be given an email address on their induction into the Charity
• Staff must familiarise themselves with the Charity’s ICT Security Policy
• If necessary staff email addresses can be publicly displayed i.e. on posters, clearly stating the staff name;
• Under no circumstances should a staff member give their personal email address to a young person, or any person in direct work with the Charity
• Materials sent will be selected that are unbiased and meet equal opportunities criteria in
terms of ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, disability, religion and beliefs & age.

Social networking

• Staff intending to use Social Networking Sites in a work capacity should do so from a separate profile than their personal profile, should they have one;
• Prior consent/sign-off should be sought from the Charity Marketing & Communications
department before first use of Social Networking Sites to communicate with Young People;
• No Staff member should set up a work profile without prior consent from the committee
• In order to protect themselves from risk of allegations, we recommend that staff using Social Networking Sites with a personal profile – in a private capacity – should set their privacy settings so only friends can view their profile;
• Under no circumstances should a staff member with a personal profile add a young person the Charity works with or has worked with within the last five years as a friend on a Social Networking Sites;
• Staff must familiarise themselves with the Charity ICT Security Policy;

Instant messaging

• Under no circumstances should staff communicate with a young person through an instant messaging site;
• Under no circumstances should staff give their instant messaging address to a young person;
• If staff receive an instant message from a young person they must not engage – they should inform the Chair of the Charity. A file note will be made following notification from a worker that they have been Instant messaged. This is for the benefit of the worker and ensures that nothing is hidden.

Recording

We are committed to capturing young people’s views and involving them in planning for the
future. In order to do this, it is from time to time beneficial to record young people either
individually or as a group. We also seek to record activities so we can showcase what we do and
why it works. However, in all cases where recording is undertaken, whether audio, video or
photographic, prior permission must always be obtained (Parents consent must be obtained)

• Staff must ensure that where a young person is under 18, or is deemed vulnerable, that
permission to record images or voice is obtained from a parent, or other person holding
parental responsibility. This will normally be done via the signing of the Personal Information Form (PI form) or the Research consent form where this is appropriate.
• any restrictions stipulated by parents or other carers i.e. voice recording only, must be
respected.
• it is essential that all members of a group have valid permissions obtained before undertaking group recording
• particular care must be taken to ensure that images and recordings are only used for
legitimate purposes, and that they are not released to non Charity staff without specific
agreement being obtained about how such images are to be used.

Confidentiality

Members of staff may have access to confidential information about young people in order to
undertake their everyday responsibilities. In some circumstances staff may be given highly
sensitive or private information. They should never use confidential or personal information about
a pupil or her/his family for their own, or others’ advantage (including that of partners, friends,
relatives or other schools/services).

Information must never be used to intimidate, humiliate, or embarrass the young person.

Confidential information about a child or young person should never be used casually in
conversation or shared with any person other than on a need-to-know basis. In circumstances
where the child’s identity does not need to be disclosed the information should be used
anonymously.

There are some circumstances in which a member of staff may be expected to share information
about a child, for example when abuse is alleged or suspected. In such cases, individuals have a
duty to pass information on without delay, but only to those with designated child protection
responsibilities (Dan Stone).

Staff are expected to treat any information they receive about young people in a discreet and
sensitive manner. If a member of staff is in any doubt about whether to share information or keep it confidential he or she should seek guidance from a senior member of staff. Any media or legal enquiries should be passed to Marketing & Communications staff or the Chair.

The storing and processing of personal information about young people is governed by the Data
Protection Act 1998. Daniel Barnett Arts Foundation has a designated Data Protection Officer (Kerry Hardy) and a related policy, both of which are sources of support in this area.

Ethical conduct

Daniel Barnett Arts Foundation expects staff or anyone carrying out work for the charity to adhere to and uphold the highest standards of professional conduct during any work carried out.

Contractors

In situations where contractors (examples: plumbers, electricians, builders etc.) are required to
engage in planned or emergency work on premises where young people are either residing or
temporarily working, the following applies

• Contractors should not generally have access to accommodation used by young
people when it is occupied;
• Contractors should be made aware (by whoever commissions them) of the nature of our work with young people, and should be asked to make reasonable adjustments to their working practices to minimise risk to themselves to young people, to staff and the public (e.g. securing tools and materials);
• When using third party premises where contractors not commissioned by the Charity may be present, the Chair of the Charity should manage – or designate another member of staff to manage – the interface between contractors and/or their equipment and young people for whom we are responsible.

Those particular contractors who may work unsupervised on Charity events should obtain an Enhanced DBS Disclosure through Brathay. Contractors who are not checked in this way should only be given keys or door codes if supervised. Keys must be checked in and door codes changed after use.

Staff Recruitment

• All appointments are made following a face-to-face interview that explores attitudes,
motivation, temperament and personal qualities as well as skills and experience relevant to the role.
• All offers of employment/work are made conditional to satisfactory references and a DBS
check at either standard or enhanced level depending on the nature and responsibilities of the post.
• All staff/workers are subject to a DBS check at the relevant level. For all staff working directly with young people, this will be at the enhanced level.
• Candidates must provide appropriate proof of identity and their right to work in the UK before appointment is confirmed. This usually includes documents including: a photograph, current address, and confirmation of name and date of birth. Employment status may require passport verification, or EU identity document, and/or National Insurance number.
• Where candidates are recruited from overseas, extra care is taken in pursuing references and carrying out the relevant checks. Where appropriate, advice from the DBS Overseas
Information Service is obtained.
• All staff/workers are made aware of the Charity safeguarding policy and procedures, and their obligations regarding child protection, as part of their induction. Staff/workers with face-toface access to young people will receive additional on-going training as appropriate.
• In the event of any child protection incidents, the designated person/ persons are responsible for keeping the relevant records in a confidential manner.

(To include the recruitment of: permanent and fixed-term staff; sessional-, and associate workers; volunteers and trustees.)

HANDLING A DISCLOSURE OF ABUSE MADE BY A YOUNG PERSON WITH WHOM THE CHARITY IS WORKING

If a young person with whom the Charity is working, discloses abuse, or risk of abuse, to a member of staff or volunteer, he or she must take the following action. First of all, it should be established whether the young person is legally a child (someone under 18 years old) or a young adult.

If the Person is Legally a Child
The worker should:
• listen carefully to what the child/young person is saying;
• explain that because this is a serious matter, it cannot remain confidential between the
worker and the young person. The staff member should inform the young person that she/he will need to talk to their manager to decide what action may be necessary to ensure that the young person is safe in the future, and also to ensure the safety of any other child or young person who is in contact with the alleged abuser;
• undertake to keep the child/young person informed as to any action that is proposed and to support the young person through this.

The worker must inform the Designated Person of the situation as soon as possible. If the Designated Person is unavailable, then the Charity Chair should be contacted.

If the concern arises out of office hours and it is not possible to contact the Designated Person or Charity Chair, and where a child/young person has disclosed serious abuse, then a referral should be made directly to Children’s Services, rather than placing a child/young person at risk by unreasonable delay in the making of a referral. In the event that it proves difficult to get hold of the contact details of the relevant Children’s Services, contact the Police locally (ideally via a non-emergency number) and ask for the Duty Officer of the Child Protection Team.

The Designated Person should decide whether or not to make a referral to Children’s Services. All serious allegations of abuse should be referred to Children’s Services, however if in any doubt a consultation should take place with the relevant Children’s Services duty team. This is not only to protect the young person themselves but also any other children or young people that the alleged abuser may be in contact with.

If the young person has a named social worker, she/he should be contacted with the referral. If
the named worker is not available, or if there is no named worker, the Designated Person should ask to speak to the Children’s Services Duty Manager, explaining that they wish to make a child protection referral.

If the situation arises out of office hours, the Designated Person should contact the local out of hours/emergency social worker.

When making the referral, the Designated Person should note the name of the person in Children’s Services who they have contacted and the time and date when the referral was made. They will also need to clarify what action Children’s Services are proposing to take and the timescale for this, and also how the child/young person’s immediate safety is to be ensured. Telephone referrals should be followed up in writing within 2 working days. All incidents, concerns and referrals in relation to children and young people and the action that results from these should be recorded.

HANDLING CONCERNS / INFORMATION FROM THIRD PARTIES

Third party information is when anyone (other than those directly involved with the Charity) passes on information or expresses their concerns.

Information from a third party regarding suspicions of child abuse cannot be ignored. If the person imparting the information has concerns, they should be encouraged to contact their local
Children’s Services, in order to discuss their concerns with a qualified social worker. If they do not wish to do so, it should be explained to them that the Charity is obligated to. The concerns should be logged and any action taken recorded fully.

• First of all it should be established whether the young person is legally a child (someone under 18) or a vulnerable adult.

If the Person is Legally a Child or a Vulnerable Adult
The worker should clarify with the third party and record the following:
• The nature of their concerns;
• How and why their concerns have arisen;
• Whether they wish to remain anonymous; and
• What involvement they are having or have had with the young person and/or family
members.

The worker must inform their manager of the situation as soon as possible. If the concern arises
out of office hours and it is not possible to contact any manager, and where the information
relates to serious abuse, then a referral should be made directly to Children’s Services, rather than placing a child/young person at risk by unreasonable delay in the making of a referral.

If it is possible to contact the Designated Person, they should decide whether or not to make a referral to Children’s Services. All serious allegations of abuse should be referred to Children’s Services however if in any doubt a consultation should take place with the relevant Children’s Services duty team. This is not only to protect the young person themselves but also any other children or young people that the alleged abuser may be in contact with.

If the individual has a named social worker, she/he should be contacted with the referral. If the
named worker is not available, or if there is no named worker, the Designated Person should ask to speak to the Children’s Services Duty Manager within the Local Authority, explaining that they wish to make a child protection referral.

If the situation arises out of office hours, the Designated Person should contact the local out of hours/emergency social worker.

When making the referral, the Designated Person should note the name of the person in Children’s Services who they have contacted and the time and date when the referral was made. The line manager will also need to clarify what action Children’s Services are proposing to take and the timescale for this, and also how the child/young person’s immediate safety is to be ensured. Telephone referrals should be followed up in writing within 48 hours (2 working days).

If the Charity Chair or equivalent has not already been informed of the situation, the manager
should do this as soon as possible. There will need to be a discussion as to how the child or young person and all the staff directly involved in the situation can best be supported for the duration of the investigation.

All incidents, concerns and referrals in relation to young people and vulnerable adults and the
action that results from these should be recorded.

Charity Worker should not “investigate” the matter. That is for Children’s Services and
perhaps the Police. The Charity worker must only gather sufficient information to establish that there is concern about risk of harm to a child / vulnerable adult.

If the person is neither a child nor a vulnerable adult
This is not a safeguarding issue; however consider other lines of support / referral e.g. the Police.

HANDLING ALLEGATIONS OF ABUSE MADE AGAINST CHARITY STAFF

1. Any allegation of abuse against a Charity staff must be taken seriously, both for the sake of the child/young person involved and the member of staff themselves. Allegations of abuse by a member of staff include:
• Behaving in a way that has harmed a child, or may have harmed a child/young person
• Committing a criminal offence against or related to a child/young person
• Behaving towards a child/young person in a way that indicates s/he is unsuitable to work with children/young people

2. If it is a child/young person making the allegation, the member of staff receiving the allegation
should remain calm and inform the child/young person that:

• It is a serious matter and will need to be discussed with the appropriate manager in order to decide how the matter will be investigated
• The child/young person will be kept informed about the progress of the investigation

3. The member of staff receiving the allegation should immediately contact the Designated Person. The worker who is the subject of the investigation must NOT be informed of the allegation at this point.

4. The Designated Person of the worker against whom the allegation has been made should refer the matter immediately to the Charity Chair and they will decide:
• Whether there are sufficient grounds for taking further action;
• If there are sufficient grounds for taking further action, the decision as to whether the
incident is serious enough to be considered as potential child abuse will be informed by a consultation with the relevant Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO).
• The LADO will be kept informed of all decisions taken by Charity in relation to the
allegation and the person/s subject to the allegation;

5. In cases where there is insufficient information to make this decision the Designated Person will need to decide, as a matter of urgency, what information is needed and how this
should be obtained, so that a decision can then be taken as to whether or not this situation should be considered as a matter of potential child abuse.

6. If the ‘responsible senior manager’ in consultation with the LADO decides that the situation
should be considered as potential child abuse, she/he should refer the matter to the relevant
Children’s Services department and request that an emergency planning/strategy meeting be
convened to plan the process of the investigation including the interviewing of the member of staff who is the subject of the allegations.

7. The Designated Person will also need to decide whether for the duration of the
investigation the member of staff should continue in their work, be moved to other duties, or be
suspended in accordance with the terms of the Disciplinary Policy and Procedure in making this decision the ‘responsible senior manager’ will need to take
into account:

• The need to avoid further contact between the child/young person and the named member of staff
• The feasibility of the named member of staff continuing to work in their post whilst a child abuse investigation is under way
• The potential risk to other children/young people
• The possibility of the member of staff seeking to interfere with the investigation

8. The suspension or moving of the member of staff does not indicate an assumption of guilt. The
purpose is to facilitate an effective investigation. If the worker is subsequently cleared, there can
then be no allegation of a ‘cover up’. If a staff member requests to be suspended during the
investigation, this should be considered.

9. At this point the ‘responsible senior manager’ will need to inform the named member of staff
that an allegation has been made against him/her and that this matter has been referred to
Children’s Services to be formally investigated, and that Children’s Services (and possibly the
police) will be interviewing the member of staff in the near future.

10. To avoid prejudicing the investigation the details of the allegation should not be discussed prior to the Children’s Services interview, and the member of staff should be instructed not to discuss this with other colleagues.

11. There should be no contact between the alleged perpetrator and the child/young person
making the allegation and, if appropriate, no contact with any other child/young people linked to
the Trust.

12. A named manager from the Charity, who is not involved in the line management of the member of staff and who will not be involved in the investigation, should be appointed to offer general support over the period of the investigation.

13. This information should always be given to the member of staff in writing, in addition to any
verbal communication. In the event of a suspension from work, these discussions and the written
communication, must also comply with the procedure for suspension set out in the Disciplinary
Policy and Procedure, and HR advice must be sought.

14. The ‘responsible senior manager’ will, in consultation with the member of staff’s line manager, decide what should be said to:
• The child/young person making the allegation;
• The other staff in the Service and any other children/young people linked to the Service.

15. Any details of the allegation should only be provided on a strict ‘need to know’ basis.

16. Once the Children’s Services investigation has been completed, the Designated Person should decide whether any further action is needed in relation to the information arising from the investigation. Depending on the outcome or the investigation, it may or may not be appropriate at this point to the Charity formal disciplinary procedures. This decision should be conveyed to the member of staff within seven days of the completion of the investigation.

17. Any contact from the media concerning any allegation of abuse should immediately be
redirected to the Designated Person.

18. The same procedures will be undertaken in relation to volunteers.

CONCERNS IN RELATION TO YOUNG PEOPLE WITH WHOM THE CHARITY IS WORKING

1. During all Charity Events should have accessible to staff.

2. If a staff member receives information that leads him or her to believe that a child or child
relative, of a child or young person with whom the Charity is working, has been abused, or is at risk of abuse, he or she must take the following action:

2.1 The staff member must inform the Designated Person of the situation as soon as possible. If the line manager is unavailable within office hours, then a more senior manager should be contacted. If no-one in the line-management chain is available, the CEO should be contacted;

2.2 During Charity Events there should always be a Designated Person who will be contactable;

2.3 In the case of a volunteer receiving the information, he or she must inform the member of
staff to whom he or she is accountable;

2.4 If the concern arises out of office hours and it is not possible to contact Designated Person, then a referral should be made directly to Children’s Services, rather than placing a child at risk by unreasonable delay in the making of a referral.

2.5 If the line manager agrees that there is a serious concern regarding a child’s safety and
welfare, she/he should make a referral to the relevant Children’s Services Department without
delay. In most situations it will be appropriate to inform the child or young person that a referral is going to be made to Children’s Services, to explain the reasons for this and to offer to support the young person through the resulting investigation;

2.6 The only exceptions to this are if, in the line manager’s view, informing the child or young
person that a referral was going to be made would:
.. impede the investigation or
.. place the child at greater risk or place the member of staff concerned at risk.
If such exceptions apply, a referral should be made directly to the relevant Children’s Services
Department without informing the child or young person first;

2.7 If the child or young person has a named social worker she/he should be contacted with the
referral. If the named worker is not available, or if there is no named worker, the Brathay line
manager should ask to speak to the Children’s Services Duty Manager, explaining that they wish to make a child protection referral;

2.8 If the situation arises out of office hours, the Designated Person should contact the local out of hours/emergency social worker. If for any reason the emergency social worker is not available, then the duty officer in the local police child protection team should be contacted;

2.9 When making the referral, the Designated Person should note the name of the person in Children’s Services who they have contacted and the date and time when the referral was made. The line manager will also need to clarify what action Children’s Services are proposing to take and the timescale for this. Any referral made by telephone will need to be followed up with a written referral;

2.10 If the Designated Person has not already been informed of the situation, the Charity Worker should do this as soon as possible (in the absence of an Area Manager the CEO should be contacted). There will need to be a discussion as to how the child or young person and all the staff directly
involved in the situation can best be supported for the duration of the investigation;

2.11 All incidents, concerns and referrals in relation to children and young people and the action
that results from these should be recorded. Charity Worker should not “investigate” the matter. That is for Children’s Services and perhaps the Police. Charity Worker must only gather sufficient information to establish that there is concern about risk of harm to a child.

LONE WORKING PROCEDURES
LONE WORKING & SAFEGUARDING PROCEDURES

1. Most Charity Events work will be conducted in either a group work setting or on a
one-to-one basis with other staff nearby. This policy sets out protocols for working in
isolation; i.e. a staff member working on a one-to-one basis with a young person when
no one else is present.

2. Management
All one-to-one meetings with young people must be planned in advance and a senior
manager (Operations Manager) made aware of the meeting. Details of the meeting
must be recorded in worker’s Outlook Calendar and/or a signing out book. This should
include:
.. Date
.. Time frame
.. Meeting location
.. A project specific risk assessment should be completed and signed by all workers
working on the project
.. Signed Personal Safety Assessment based on aide memoire on pages 6 & 7 of this
document.

3. Guidance on Meeting Locations
Staff should consider their response to any allegation made against them if they were
answering questions from a police officer or a court judge.

Example: “Yes, we met in my car in the supermarket carpark and yes it was dark,
Officer” is not as doesn’t sound as good as “yes we met in the Costa Coffee house on
Friday morning, Officer”.

Whilst the positive intention will be to support the young person, staff must ensure their
own safety is not compromised. Staff should avoid meetings with young people alone and
out of sight of another adult. Meeting locations should be ‘public and appropriate’ examples
include meeting in cafés, coffee shops, bowling alley, or open spaces within

larger buildings and not in side rooms with a closed door. Meetings should not take
place at the young person’s home unless the young person’s legal guardian is present in
the house and is aware of the meeting.

4. Safety leading up to and following a meeting
Staff should consider any risks associated with young people travelling to and from any
arranged one-to-one meetings. E.g. does the young person need to use public transport
to attend the meeting, does the transport timetable correspond with the meeting
times?

5. Safe Practice During The Meeting

5.1 Note Taking
Staff should make notes, preferably during the meeting. If this isn’t possible or
appropriate, notes should be written up immediately following the meeting. Staff
should be aware that should a safeguarding allegation be made against them following a
one-to-one meeting, the notes may be required in any ensuing court case.

Personal Safety

As part of the Trust’s commitment to Safeguarding management, this section provides a
procedure designed to assist staff in reducing the likelihood of unjust and unfounded
allegations being made against them. To a very significant extent you can control the risks
to which they are exposed and thus you have a responsibility to take care of their own safety
within your work.

Personal Safety Assessment

A Personnel Safety Assessment involves a deliberate and focused review for potential safety
concerns prior to starting the activity. Taking a few minutes to make this assessment
improves your chances of accomplishing the activity without any resultant safeguarding
incidents taking place.

How and when should you conduct a Personal Safety Assessment?

Make sure you are prepared for the one to one session. In addition, once engaged in the
session you should watch out for changing conditions that might warrant taking Time Out
(Time Out – stop what you are doing and take a moment to ask yourself or discuss with
peers or supervising staff any safety concerns; this could be done via a phone call.

PERSONAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT

1. I will prepare for each activity / task by:
a) Ensuring that I have prepared for the session;
b) By wearing my identity badge;
c) By ensuring that I have my mobile phone with me and that it is fully charged and
secure.
d) By ensuring that I have/will have mobile phone reception at the designated meting
place;
e) Addressing safety concerns prior to the start of the session (example being
comfortable regarding the meeting location;
f) Considering what could go wrong and preparing accordingly; if I don’t know I will
ask my manager or an experienced colleague;
g) Ensure that I have briefed my manager.

2. I will stay safe going to, during and after the session by:
a) Not deviating from my planned session; by following the provided guidance and
procedures;
b) Looking for unsafe situations and taking action to prevent harm to myself and to
reduce the risk of false allegations being made against me;
c) Observing changing conditions (example young persons peers etc suddenly turn up
during my planned session;

3. I will communicate safety / safeguarding concerns to my manager in a timely manner;

4. I will remember I can call a Time Out any time I think conditions are unsafe for me or my
colleagues or whenever I am not certain that things are going right.

5. Following the one-to-one session I will write up my notes and ensure they are available
for my manager to review at my next one-to-one meeting.

Safeguarding Handout for reference.

We all have a statutory duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and as part of our charity safeguarding policy take this responsibility seriously.

If at any hospital establishment or charity event, you have any concerns about a child, you must share this information immediately with the Designated Safeguarding Lead or another alternative post holder. Do not think your worry is insignificant if it is about appearance or behaviour –the charity would rather you told us and we would rather know about something that appears small than miss a worrying situation.

If you think the matter is very serious and may be related to child protection issues, for example: physical, emotional, sexual abuse or neglect, you MUST find one of the designated professionals detailed below and provide them with a written record of your concern.

If you are unable to locate them, please inform the next person on the list below and ask them to speak with you immediately about a confidential and urgent matter. Any allegation concerning a member of the charity committee, parent, artist, patient, visitor, volunteer should be reported immediately to Diane Barnett (Chair of charity) and the DSL at the hospital establishment.

Our Safeguarding team and contact numbers are as follows –
• Designated Safeguard Lead – please ask at the hospital you are working at for this information before a workshop commences. Sheffield, Leeds and Nottingham hospitals will have this information on the ward.
• Deputy Designated Safeguard Lead / Chair of Charity – Diane Barnett, 202 Badsley Moor Lane, Rotherham. Telephone
• Third Contact – Katie Brown – Committee member – 91 Cowley Lane, Sheffield, S35 1SX. Telephone – 07852453880

The Daniel Barnett Arts Foundation strives to Safeguard and promote the welfare of all our children.